citizens

Digital Local Democracy – The 21st Century Councillor

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 Brainstorm by Jessica Lock from The Noun ProjectWorkshop idea by Ken Eastwood & Cllr David Harrington


All of the workshops at Local Democracy for Everyone have been created by our participants. We’re sharing a summary of each workshop idea to help you decide what you’d most like to participate in – and so that everyone can start to share their comments about each idea.


Digital Local Democracy – The 21st Century Councillor

The challenge:

We have all seen how the digital revolution is empowering citizens to engage in campaigns or community issues in different ways. Against this backdrop, the role of elected representatives can become unclear. This workshop seeks to explore this issue in further detail, considering the opportunities presented by digital technologies.

We have seen how social media and other digital tools are enabling self-organisation and facilitating campaigning, whether against an oppressive regime in an overseas country, or an unpopular planning application much nearer home.

Facebook, forums and blogs are increasingly being used by local communities, to have their own place on the web. An online mixture of parish newsletter, noticeboard and discussion forum, these ‘hyper-local’ websites are enriching communities by connecting individuals with shared interests, often based on place and belonging.

Ken Eastwood has experience of developing online communities, including for a West Yorkshire village and Parish Council, and believes that there is opportunity for community leaders and elected representatives to engage with citizens in new ways.

David Harrington has been reaching out to citizens making use of technology including by running ward surgeries online using Skype.

Together, we are interested in how elected representatives can make use of digital technologies and in the opportunity presented by online communities.


#notwestminster #cllr


Ken EastwoodKen Eastwood
@keneastwood
Digital Nomads

Ken Eastwood is the founder of Digital Nomads. He has 26 years local government experience, latterly as an Assistant Director and member of the leadership team at Barnsley MBC.

Ken has significant expertise in transformation and technology enabled change. An author of articles on digital innovation and new ways of working and delivering services, he is a well known commentator on the digital agenda. Former Project Nomad national eGov board member and founder and national lead of Public Sector Nomads, Ken has been at the forefront of mobile & flexible working for over a decade.


Councillor David HarringtonCouncillor David Harrington
@cllrharrington
Cabinet Member for Corporate Management and Finance,
Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council
& LGiU Online Councillor of the Year 2013

First elected in 2005, re-elected in 2007 and 2011, as an Independent, David represents Ingleby Barwick which is believed to be the largest private housing estate in western Europe. He was the first Ward Councillor in the North-East to use social media as a means of engagement in 2008. In 2013, he was awarded the title of Online Councillor of the Year by the LGiU and CCLA for his innovative use of Skype and Twitter for engaging with residents.

David Harrington – Your councillor


20 Ways to Connect Open Data and Local Democracy

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 Brainstorm by Jessica Lock from The Noun ProjectWorkshop idea by Tim Davies


All of the workshops at Local Democracy for Everyone have been created by our participants. We’re sharing a summary of each workshop idea to help you decide what you’d most like to participate in – and so that everyone can start to share their comments about each idea.


20 Ways to Connect Open Data and Local Democracy

The challenge:

Lots of energy in the open government world goes into open data. But too often data practices don’t connect with citizens in ways that shift the balance of power and lead to change. With the transparency code leading to an increase in local authority open data publication, we need to re-imagine how open data can be produced, shared and used at a local level.

I’ve spent the last five years studying open data and civic engagement, motivated by a perception of the gap between the democratic potential of open data, and the impacts it is having in practice. This workshop is an opportunity to pull together learning from these various experiences, and turn it into a practice exploration of how local government could do open data. It will also challenge me to come up with 20 different ways to connect open data and democracy.

On the short-list so far:

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Practicing open data engagement

Open Data Discourses

Thinking about small data

Data Murals

Citizen Science

What’s on your list?


#notwestminster #opendata


Tim DaviesTim Davies
@timdavies

Researcher, practitioner and Co-director at Practical Participation

Tim Davies is a researcher and practitioner working at the intersection of technology, civic engagement and social justice. As a PhD Candidate at the University of Southampton, and affiliate at the Harvard Berkman Center for Internet and Society, he has been working on understanding the democratic dimensions of open government data policy. From 2012 to 2014 he led the World Wide Web Foundation’s Open Data in Developing Countries project, coordinating a global research network exploring the uses of data in local and national governance.

Tim’s blog


A public values approach for using digital technologies to enhance local democracy

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 Brainstorm by Jessica Lock from The Noun ProjectWorkshop idea by Dr Paul Hepburn


All of the workshops at Local Democracy for Everyone have been created by our participants. We’re sharing a summary of each workshop idea to help you decide what you’d most like to participate in – and so that everyone can start to share their comments about each idea.


A public values approach for using digital technologies to enhance local democracy

The challenge:

How can we create more collaborative, inclusive and democratic processes for developing policy and delivering public services? Public values are an important place to start in this discussion as they focus on what has meaning for people, not what public administrators think might be best for them. Significantly, this suggests an active sense of adding or creating value rather than a passive sense of safeguarding the status quo. 

How do we capture or determine what is of public value?

How do we enable the voices of ordinary citizens to be heard above that those that traditionally dominate the political discourse?

Can digital technology help or are the usual suspects going to dominate online as they do offline?

Might a local citizens’ alliance based on civic or community groups better contest the public sphere?


#notwestminster #values


Dr Paul HepburnDr Paul Hepburn
Heseltine Institute for Public Policy and Practice, University of Liverpool

Dr Paul Hepburn is a post–doctoral researcher for the Heseltine Institute for Public Policy and Practice at the University of Liverpool. Paul was awarded a PhD studentship at the University of Manchester in 2007 to examine the impact of the internet on local democracy. This followed a 20 year career in local government primarily working in policy development and delivery that latterly focused on e-government initiatives.

Most recently he has worked upon evaluating local policy innovations such as the Liverpool Mayoral model and the co-production of tablet technology for elderly people.