Doing devolution without permission

Ideas from the “Doing devolution without permission” workshop at #notwestminster 2015, hosted by Andrew Wilson…

Andrew Wilson at #notwestminster
Andrew Wilson at #notwestminster – photo NotWestminster (23 of 30) by Anthony Mckeown

Workshop challenge

There is a new enthusiasm in England for local and regional government, but people can’t yet see how they can make it happen. This workshop asked how we can start doing devolution from the bottom up, as soon as we walked out of the room. We talked about what we understand by devolution, why we think it is of value and what it might mean for us to do devolution rather than waiting for it.


The three ideas

Flag created by Juan Pablo Bravo from The Noun Project

  1. I will use social media to ask people to question the centralised state.
  2. I will ask the questions of others:
     
    What do you think devolution is?
    What do you want it to be?
  3. I will carry on what we are all already doing together and take personal responsibility for being mindful of connecting that, by talking to people, to the wider devolution conversation.

 

Want to join us in working on one or more of these ideas?
You can Leave a Reply at the foot of this page.

Placard

Devolution placard

 


Blog

How can our voices be fairly heard? Huddersfield and Newcastle #notwestminster Conversations – by Andrew Wilson

“We sat round two tables and talked first about what we understand by devolution and why we think it’s of value.”


Tweets


About the workshop host

Andrew WilsonAndrew Wilson
@__andrew_wilson
Hannah Directory / Foldup CiC

Andrew has been using mobile technology for creative participation for well over a decade. His work includes socially engaged software development and location aware games for children, families and even grown ups. Andrew has worked with large organisations including The Guardian, the BBC, Greater Manchester Police, an NHS trust and Kirklees Council as well as local councillors, front line council staff, and many third sector and small voluntary groups including a drugs treatment agency, a regeneration charity on the Aylesbury estate in South London, tenants and residents associations and a community allotment. Some of this work has been in partnerships supported by Nesta through three of its national programmes, Reboot Britain, Make It Local and Innovation in Giving.


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